Blind Spot by Dani Pettrey

FBI agent Declan Grey is in the chase of his life–but isn’t sure exactly what he’s chasing after. Threatened by a terrorist that “the wrath is coming,” Grey fears something horrible is about to be unleashed on American soil. When his investigation leads him to a closed immigrant community, he turns to Tanner Shaw to help him. She’s sought justice for refugees and the hurting around the world, and if there’s anyone who can help him, it’s Tanner.

Tanner Shaw has joined the FBI as a crisis counselor . . . meaning she now has more opportunity to butt heads with Declan. But that tension also includes a spark she can’t deny, and she’s pretty sure Declan feels the same. But before anything can develop between them, they discover evidence of a terror cell–and soon are in a race against the clock to stop the coming “wrath” that could cost thousands their lives. – from author’s website


As with the first two books in this series, I enjoyed this book. It was fast-paced and took the reader through two unrelated cases, although at times I wondered if they were going to be connected. This book is better if you have read the whole series because it ties back to what has happened in the first two, the second one especially. I liked how the two stories overlapped with the characters. Even though it meant there were several POV characters, some only getting a couple of scenes, I still enjoyed the book as I already knew the characters from the previous books so it didn’t seem like it was overdone.
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Where We Belong by Lynn Austin

In the city of Chicago in 1892, the rules for Victorian women are strict, their roles limited. But sisters Rebecca and Flora Hawes are not typical Victorian ladies. Their love of adventure and their desire to use their God-given talents has brought them to the Sinai Desert–and into a sandstorm.

Accompanied by Soren Petersen, their somber young butler, and Kate Rafferty, a street urchin who is learning to be their ladies’ maid, the two women are on a quest to find an important biblical manuscript. As the journey becomes more dangerous and uncertain, the four travelers sift through memories of their past, recalling the events that shaped them and the circumstances that brought them to this time and place. – from author’s website


Normally, I like Lynn Austin’s books but I found this one dragged along too much. It was very slow moving and I got about a quarter of the way through the book and I still had no idea what was really going on. A lot of it was flashbacks. I understand that it was to give depth to the characters and insight into how they were raised and who they were but I actually found it harder to get into the characters and follow the story. In complete honesty, I didn’t actually finish the book because I wasn’t enjoying it so it may have gotten better further into the book.

Blue Ridge Sunrise by Denise Hunter

Former free spirit Zoe Collins swore she’d never again set foot in Copper Creek or speak to the man who broke her heart. But return she must when her beloved Granny dies, leaving the family legacy to Zoe–a peach orchard nestled at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

When Zoe returns home with her daughter and boyfriend Kyle, she finds that she’s the only person in town who doesn’t expect her to give up the life she’s established far away from Copper Creek. Everyone believes she was born to run the orchard, but how can she make it her home after so many years?

Cruz Huntley never quite got over his first love Zoe Collins, the little sister of his best friend Brady. Not when she cheated on him during their “break,” not when she took off to parts unknown with good-for-nothing Kyle Jenkins, and not even now—five years later.

As life-changing decisions and a history with Cruz hang over Zoe’s head, tensions rise between her and Kyle. Even as she comes to terms with the shifting relationships in her life, Zoe still isn’t sure if she can remain in Copper Creek with her new responsibilities . . . and her first love. – from author’s website


I had mixed feelings about this book. At points I liked it, reading about Cruz and Zoe getting another chance. But at other points, I didn’t really like it, as scenes moved from one to the other so quickly. Because a chunk of the book was written when they were in high school or just out of high school, it felt more like a young adult novel to me. Even for the rest of the book, they were in their early to mid-twenties. The faith aspect of the book was very minimal which was alright except that it felt nonchalant and only cropped up when the characters were in trouble mostly. However, I liked that I got to see their past relationship instead of just reading about it from what they reveal in the present.

Deadly Proof by Rachel Dylan

Tapped as lead counsel in a corporate cover-up lawsuit against Mason Pharmaceutical, Kate Sullivan knows this case could make her career. What really drives her, though, is getting justice for the victims whose lives were ruined by the company’s dangerous new drug. But when a whistleblower turns up dead, it paints a target on the back of everyone involved.

Former Army Ranger turned private investigator Landon James steps in to handle security for Kate. He’s still haunted by mistakes in his past and is determined never to let something like that happen again. But it soon appears someone is willing to do anything–even commit murder–to keep the case from going to trial.

As danger closes in, Landon can’t help but admire Kate’s courage and resolve–but will her determination not to back down become too great of a risk? – from author’s website


In the first couple of chapters, there were four different point-of-view characters which I didn’t particularly like because I couldn’t get into the characters. Each POV was also short making it harder to delve into any one character or scene. They got a little longer further into the book but it took a while before I could actually relate to the characters because I wasn’t following any one character for a substantial period of time.

A Matter of Trust by Susan May Warren

Champion backcountry snowboarder Gage Watson has left the limelight behind after the death of one of his fans. After being sued for negligence and stripped of his sponsorships, he’s remade his life as a ski patrol in Montana’s rugged mountains, as well as serving on the PEAK Rescue team. But he can’t seem to find his footing–or forget the woman he loved, who betrayed him.

Senator and former attorney Ella Blair spends much of her time in the limelight as the second-youngest senator in the country. But she has a secret–one that cost Gage his career. More than anything, she wants to atone for her betrayal of him in the courtroom and find a way to help him put his career back on track.

When Ella’s brother goes missing on one of Glacier National Park’s most dangerous peaks, Gage and his team are called in for the rescue. But Gage isn’t so sure he wants to help the woman who destroyed his life. More, when she insists on joining the search, he’ll have to keep her safe while finding her reckless brother, a recipe for disaster when a snowstorm hits the mountain.

But old sparks relight as they search for the missing snowboarder–and suddenly, they are faced with emotions neither can deny. But when Ella’s secret is revealed, can they learn to trust each other–even when disaster happens again? – from author’s website


I thought Ella should have been older than her mid-twenties because of how long it would have taken her to become a lawyer and in the position she was in in the law office and then became a senator. It also seemed a little unbelievable for Ella and Gage to only have known each other three days before the betrayal and then not see each other for three years and yet still have such strong feelings for each other. I was also sometimes confused about whether the characters were skiing or snowboarding. At times the wording made me think they were snowboarding and then in the next scene it seemed like they were skiing. Maybe I’m just not familiar enough with that world to differentiate between the terms used. Putting those few things aside, I found the characters likable and the overall story enjoyable. Seeing the redemption in their relationship with the history of the lawsuit between them and then putting it aside to help find Ella’s brother and his friend while battling the elements was a nice little story.

Justice Buried by Patricia Bradley

In an effort to get her security consulting business off the ground, Kelsey Allen has been spending a lot of time up in the air, rappelling down buildings and climbing through windows to show business owners their vulnerabilities to thieves. When she is hired to pose as a conservator at the Pink Palace Museum in order to test their security weaknesses after some artifacts go missing, she’s ecstatic. But when her investigative focus turns from theft to murder, Kelsey knows she’s out of her league–and possibly in the cross hairs. When blast-from-the-past Detective Brad Hollister is called in to investigate, Kelsey may find that he’s the biggest security threat yet . . . to her heart. – from author’s website.

I enjoyed Kelsey’s character and how she was interested in computers but also old things. I could relate to the contradicting interests and it made her more likable. I liked Brad’s character well enough, although the situation with Elle, his ex-fiancé, was a little frustrating and off-putting. I also didn’t entirely like how it concluded itself. The suspense in the book kept me on the edge of my seat and I enjoyed constantly trying to figure out who was behind the murders but never quite being sure until the climax. It made for an enjoyable cold case turned active investigation.

Over Maya Dead Body by Sandra Orchard

FBI Special Agent Serena Jones arrives on Martha’s Vineyard with her family, ready for a little bit of R&R and a whole lot of reminiscing as they celebrate the engagement of an old family friend. But crime doesn’t take a vacation, and she’s soon entangled in an investigation of a suspicious death tied to an antiquities smuggling ring.

When her investigation propels her into danger, Serena must stay the course and solve this case before anyone else dies. But just how is she supposed to do that when the two men in her life arrive on the scene, bringing with them plenty of romantic complications–and even a secret or two? – from author’s website


This is the first book I’ve read in this series and it would have been better if I had read the first two books as they were referenced on several occasions and I think I would have been more able to relate to the characters. Reading only this book, I didn’t get enough of a description of Nate and Tanner for my liking. For example, it never mentioned their ages or gave much of a description for what they looked like. Despite there being two murders in the book, I didn’t find the suspense to keep me on the edge of my seat, but that could also be because I wasn’t as invested in the characters.

The Way of Hope by Melissa Fisher

“Am I welcome here?”

It’s the most challenging question churches are facing today as people with varying gender and sexual identities long for a safe church to explore faith in Jesus. With a history of condemning people for their sexual temptations, desires, or orientations, many churches and Christians either live paralyzed in fear not knowing what to do or simply adopt the world’s view around them and condone.

But what if there was a different way the Church could show up?

With deep understanding born from her own painful experiences, Melissa shows that somewhere between the extremes of condemning, freezing, or condoning is the way of Jesus, a way marked with courage, compassion, and hope. The Way of Hope aims to equip the church to make a positive difference in the lives of those hurting from their relational or sexual differences as well as inspire those that have different sexual or gender identities towards a relationship with Jesus who wants to offer you a love and hope greater than anything you’ve ever known.
– from the book’s website


I found The Way of Hope to be refreshing and different in its perspective. It didn’t condemn nor condone the homosexual lifestyle but rather emphasized a relationship with Christ and how it can transform a person. This book hit me harder than a non-fiction book has in a long time even though I’m not a homosexual but I could still relate to it. I liked Melissa’s honesty with her memories, feelings, actions, etc. It made me want to listen to what she had to say and made me aware of a perspective I didn’t have before.

Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.

Hurt Road by Mark Lee

Third Day guitarist Mark Lee is no stranger to heartache and hopes deferred; the road to success is never traveled without missteps along the way. Life is messy and uncertain and full of surprises. And one of the best things he’s ever done is let go of his expectations about how life should be in order to embrace life as it is: a moment-by-moment walk with God.

Hurt Road is the engaging true story of a man who, as a teen, found in music a refuge from the uncertainties of life. Who set out to discover a better way to live than constantly struggling to make sure life turned out the way he planned it. Who stopped substituting what’s next for what’s now and learned the truth–that coming or going, God’s got us.

Poignant, funny, and thoughtful, Hurt Road dares anyone feeling knocked down or run over by their circumstances to give up control to the One who already has the road all mapped out. Includes black and white photos. – from Amazon.ca


This book was a quick read with short chapters containing stories of Mark Lee’s life but also life lessons he learned and wants to impart with us. It focused not only on the positive points in his life but also negative ones. He wrote it in such a way that he was stating this was what happened and how he interpreted it. He turned the negatives into learning opportunities. The book didn’t focus as much on the Third Day (Christian band) aspect of his life as I thought it would since that is what he is known for. Instead, it was a balanced retelling of his life from when he was a kid till now. It was an enjoyable read of Mark Lee’s life that blended lighthearted and less lighthearted moments, his music career and that of Third Day, as well as God’s hand through all of it.

All Saints by Michael Spurlock & Jeanette Windle


Newly ordained, Michael Spurlock’s first assignment is to pastor All Saints, a struggling church with twenty-five devoted members and a mortgage well beyond its means. The best option may be too close the church rather than watch it wither any further. But when All Saints hesitantly risks welcoming a community of Karen refugees from Burma–former farmers scrambling for a fresh start in America–Michael feels they may be called to an improbable new mission.

Michael must choose between closing the church and selling the property–or listening to a still, small voice challenging the people of All Saints to risk it all and provide much-needed hope to their new community. Together, they risk everything to plant seeds for a future that might just save them all.

Discover the true story that inspired the film while also diving deeper into the background of the Karen people, the church, and how a community of believers rally to reach out to those in need, yet receive far more than they dared imagine. – from publisher’s website


I received a copy of this book from Bethany House in exchange for an honest review.

I watched the movie of this story about a month ago and I liked reading the book as it brought more depth to the main characters. It included a lot of Ye Win’s and Michael Spurlock’s background and had an overall biographical feel and didn’t just focus on saving the church as was shown in the movie. I found this book to be an inspiring message of how God works and how He can work through a community that comes together and relies on Him. I also liked that it included what happened even when Spurlock left for another church, showing that it was God working through Spurlock and that He could still work in the church regardless of who was leading it.